.Huge swathes of animal sacrifices were carried out in Bangladesh's capital
.Designated kill zones were rendered out of action due to deluge and floods
.Instead, Muslims took to the side-streets to kill for the Feast of Sacrifice
.Blood from animals flowed into the Dhaka streets and turned the roads red


Huge swathes of animal sacrifices marking the Islamic festival Eid al-Adha turned the streets of Bangladesh's capital into rivers of blood.

Authorities in Dhaka had designated areas in the city where residents could slaughter animals, but heavy downpours Tuesday rendered them out of action.

Instead, Muslims took to car parks, garages and alleyways to traditionally mark Eid al-Adha - or the Feast of Sacrifice - by slaughtering livestock and when the blood flowed into the streets, it turned them red. 


Huge swathes of animal sacrifices marking the Islamic festival Eid al-Adha turned the streets of Bangladesh's capital into rivers of blood


People wade past a road turned red after blood from sacrificial animals on Eid al-Adha mixed with water from heavy rainfall in Dhaka, Bangladesh


Authorities in Dhaka had designated areas in the city where residents could slaughter animals, but heavy downpours Tuesday rendered them out of action


Instead, Muslims took to car parks, garages and alleyways to traditionally mark Eid al-Adha - or the Feast of Sacrifice - by slaughtering livestock and when the blood flowed into the streets, it turned them red


Muslims took to car parks, garages and alleyways to traditionally mark Eid al-Adha - or the Feast of Sacrifice - by slaughtering livestock and when the blood flowed into the streets, it turned them red


Flooding is common in Dhaka, an overcrowded city of more than 10 million people, because of poor drainage systems.



Usually a goat, sheep or a cow is killed to commemorate Prophet Ibrahim's test of faith at the festival.

The meat of the sacrificed animals is shared among family and friends and poor people who cannot afford to sacrifice animals as a gesture of generosity to promote social harmony.

Flooding is common in Dhaka, an overcrowded city of more than 10 million people, because of poor drainage systems.

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This post was republished from dailymail.co.uk. You can find the original post here.